Why Write

The idea of writing a blog came to me after I was told I needed brain surgery to clip a growing aneurysm before it could cause me serious harm.  I was scared out of my wits and as I rang my family and friends to break the news, I realised I needed an easier way of keeping everyone up-to-date with how I was doing.  A blog seemed the natural outlet.  What began as a means to keep in touch with people I knew, slowly showed me I had powerful experiences to share, experiences that could be helpful to others.

Having endured and survived a stroke, two brain surgeries and two spinal injuries, I write now to share what I have experienced and learned as a means of helping myself put it all in context and in the sincere hopes it will assist others going through challenging times.
When I go to see a new doctor who has read my file, they always look surprised when they meet me. They expect to see someone with a walking aid, a serious limp or simply someone broken by circumstance. That’s not me.
I have worked hard to recover, done all the rehab I could in order to be able to live my best possible life – and it is this outcome that I want for anyone who has suffered a serious injury or illness.
All too often the medical profession gives up too soon, or insurance doesn’t cover all the treatment we need or our well-meaning loved ones coax us to go easy. So many of us quit too soon and live with limitations we might overcome if things were different.
I’m here as living proof that by taking control of your own life and your recovery, you can set your own meaningful goals, find personalised ways to rehabilitate and recover, so you too can make your best possible recovery, leading to your best possible life. After all, who knows your heart’s desires better than you.
So if you are in need of some company on your journey or know someone who would benefit from knowing they are not alone, follow my journey or share my blog, because together we are stronger and healthier.

And The Beat Goes On

Hello everybody, I hope this finds you keeping well.

As you already know, I survived my operation and it all went smoothly.  I am grateful to Jason for sending out some information for you all and your patience as we have traversed this first week.  It’s hard for me to comprehend that it’s day nine post-op already.

As per Jason’s last message, the surgeon told us she was relieved we acted when we did because once she got to the aneurysm and saw it for herself, well, her description was that it was nasty looking with very thin membranes meaning it was at high risk of bleeding and soon.  This is what we say to one another when we are having a crappy day to remind ourselves that the pain and everything else is worth the price of my life. This doesn’t stop us feeling miserable occasionally but we will never look back and regret the decision to proceed with surgery.

I hope to be able to document my progress through recovery.  My ability to do this is obviously hindered somewhat by the side effects of both surgery and the pain medications.  I am also experiencing double vision as a result of bruising to the muscle/s behind my right eye.  This bruising occurred when they were drilling into my skull close to the muscles and needs time to rest and recover.  In the meantime, I have to wear an eye patch to get rid of the double vision or I get terribly dizzy and disoriented.  The patch and slightly blurry vision in the right eye combined with a swollen eye makes reading, writing and even typing a bit challenging.  So bear with me particularly in relation to typos and spelling errors.

By the way, it is really nice to still be here!