Out The Other Side

Firstly let me start with the reassurance that I am alive and well after my brain surgery. I am very conscious that it is now past the eight week mark and I am yet to write anything about it. I have been pondering how easy it was to write after the first operation compared to this time and it seems the main difference is pain management. I was in loads of pain last time and as many of you will understand, pain can serve well as a writer’s motivation. In all seriousness, the surgery went very well but I have been so high on pain medications that most tasks of ordinary life have been beyond me. I also find myself living with profound tiredness, leaving my day’s routine to mostly sleeping, couch rest and general zombie-like house wandering. Living the dream!

Fortunately, I have in the past week or so been able to reduce the number of lovely drugs needed to tame the pain so am beginning to have a few lucid moments. Now being one of them.

So a quick update; the surgeon was very pleased with how his work went; he was able to clip the original aneurysm and the second small one from the left hand side of my skull. img_4894He also reopened the incision from the previous surgery (right side), cleaned it up a bit, removed the hardware (metal brackets and screws) left to secure the skull flap whilst it healed and filled in a depression (possibly caused by muscle atrophy since the surgery) with bone cement.

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I had asked if he could do a facelift whilst he was at it, but alas, no. By removing the metal, we are hoping for a reduction in migraines, as it is the medical opinion here that they were likely a trigger. Unlike my doctor in Australia whose sage words were, “The migraines might just be the new you after surgery”. End of advice!

I can report several improvements already in this area, with the constant jaw pain I have had since the first surgery vanishing. Additionally, the tender spots where the metal was are no longer sore. Whilst I am still experiencing localised pain at the incision, I am hopeful that as it heals, there will be further improvement.

 

Now immediately after this op, I was apparently very ill upon waking and as my beloved and devoted husband tells me, “You were puking for hours”.   Thankfully I was so out of it I have absolutely no memory of this or of being in any pain for my entire six-day hospital stay. There are plenty of other things I also don’t remember but I’ll save that for later.

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I had a slightly longer than expected stay in hospital, largely due to having several strange episodes which were initially suspected strokes. They were not, happily, thankfully, get down on my knees and thank all deities, not. During these episodes my speech became garbled or I ceased being able to get my words out, then as speech returned, it was painfully slow and I had difficulty forming words. This is called aphasia and apraxia. I experienced something similar after my stroke in 2007 but not with the same intensity.

The first two times I had an episode, the staff called a Stroke Code, which involved a team of health professionals rushing to my room, asking loads of questions, whilst taking blood, physically examining me, ordering tests and rushing me to Imaging. You may think that sounds awful, perhaps even a little frightening, and yes, had I not been stoned out of my head on pain medications, it might have been. In less than 30 minutes, I was assessed, put through the CAT scan and returned to my room, I also had an MRI. This hospital takes the possibility of stroke seriously, as I wish all hospitals would.

img_4817The initial diagnoses was that swelling near the speech centre of my brain was causing seizures, so I was then connected to an EEG machine overnight to see if they could ‘capture’ evidence of one. I did have an episode whilst hooked up but the EEG didn’t capture anything. This meant it was either migraine related or the seizure activity was too deep within my brain for the EEG to detect; (I know, I know, my head’s too dense for the machine to penetrate). As a precaution I am on anti-seizure medications for a few months. As for the other possible explanation of migraine – the surgery may have set off a new type of migraine symptom for me. I have continued to have a couple of episodes a week since coming home but we are hopeful it will resolve itself as I heal and my brain stops having a tantrum at being interfered with. I see my Neurologist this week when I am sure this will be discussed.

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Jason has been super busy looking after me, managing my medications routine and generally keeping me on track. My mum has come over from Australia to help out and allow Jason to return to work. We were kept well fed by our community here using the Meal-Train website, which worked perfectly for our needs. My incisions are healing well, my pain is slowly lessening and I am beginning to do more. Both the surgery and recovery this time are 100 times better than my previous experience.

All in all, I received excellent care from the team at University of Colorado Hospital and much love and support from our families and friends.  I am extremely thankful.

6 thoughts on “Out The Other Side

  1. OMG, surely this is the last! I feel like I have been put through the ringer just reading about your ordeal, let alone what you must be feeling. Surely now the gods will leave you alone and let you live a long and healthy life.
    On the plus side, you probably have some sexy scars

    Lots of love

    Rohan

  2. Wow! What an incredible woman you are Veraina. This is immense. I can’t believe the attitude of some medical professionals that they thought it was ok for you to live with migraines with no investigation of the cause. That is some serious hardware that they took out, I hope that really does help reduce the migraines. We are considering getting all of Julias plates taken out of her arm for a similar reason, she has been in constant pain since the surgery and has almost no functionality in her arm.
    It just sounds like such a completely difference experience that you have had over there compared to your Australian operation. Thankfully! Keep on battling on, I don’t know how you and Jason do it. Know that we think of you often and we are seeding love and healing energy. If there’s anything you need from Oz let us know and we can send it over! Xx Sue

    • Hi Sue, thanks for your comments, I really appreciate your words and good wishes. I am sad to hear that Julia has had what sounds like an dreadful time with her arm since surgery. I highly recommend second and third opinions!
      Appreciate all your support and please tell Julia I wish her all the best for her future healing. xx

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