I Knead This

Today I spent three hours baking. Baking for the simple joy of it. I tackled a Nigella Lawson recipe I have read and re-read, its allure seemingly irresistible but the complexity of it holding me at bay. I have had the cookbook open on the same recipe for two weeks now and I linger over it each time I enter the kitchen, running through the ingredients list and instructions, working through the experience, step by step in my mind, looking for a description of anything too difficult for me to perform, given my current dexterity and strength limitations.

Today it seems was the day. Damn it, I thought, standing facing the cookbook as though it were a living entity I needed to conquer. Nigella has never let me down and the end result does sound delicious – even if it is unpronounceable. I mean what is a schnecken anyway?

My mum taught me to cook, beginning when I was quite young. It was something as a child I insisted I wasn’t able to do. My mother though, was a wonderful baker and whenever my brother and I went to school with some delicious home baked treat in our lunch boxes, we were assured to have options for trade come lunch time. I have a vivid memory of sitting on a small brick fence while several other kids held their lunch boxes open for my inspection. These kids were the ones who had store bought treats (the kind we didn’t have at home) and I ‘ummed’ and ‘ahhed’ over these offerings knowing I could choose anything I wanted because of how good my mum’s baking was.

I like to think to myself now that if I had kids, I would be sending them to school with treats that would also put them at the top of the food barter totem pole.

Basil Brush CookbookMy first ever cookbook was ‘The Basil Brush Cook Book’ which looks and reads entirely like a children’s storybook and I have vague memories of baking something resembling Anzac cookies called, Daddy’s Favourite Cookies. This delightful part of my baking history was restored to me only recently and it sits in its rightful place now with the rest of my cookbooks.  Did you have a copy as well, growing up?

When my confidence in the kitchen was still poor, my mum found another small cookbook that had recipes of only five ingredients and straightforward instructions, as thus I cut my teeth and my confidence grew. I was best known for my banana muffins. Nowadays I cannot imagine not cooking but more so baking; it is in my blood and my heart. I have felt quite disconnected from cooking since coming home from hospital as work in the kitchen takes time, precision, dexterity and usually a lot of bobbing about, all things my head, hand and eyes have not appreciated.

As I have improved though I have returned to baking simple things. A few weeks ago after feeling a bit low and as though chocolate was the only possible cure, I found myself in the pantry gathering up ingredients for a batch of chocolate biscuits (another Nigella recipe) and they were delicious, velvety and rich. Rather unfortunately though they gave me indigestion so horribly that I packaged them up and sent them with Jason to his work place where they were both appreciated and devoured. Much more gratifying than eating them all myself!

What I re-discovered though was the simple joy one can find in seemingly mundane activities.  Baking is my art, my solace and my greatest pleasure and as I studied this morning’s recipe, I decided that if I paced myself, I could end this day with something tangible to show for my efforts as well as something delicious to eat.

As I said earlier, the entire production, yes, production, took three hours and provided me with a couple of physical challenges, moments of “you want me to do what?” a fantastic rehab workout with 10 minutes of dough kneading, and a boost in confidence when the end result was, as promised, looks and smells incredible and are in fact just as Nigella describes. “They are like cinnamon buns, only more so. They are stickier, puffier, gooier and generally more over the top.”  Imagine a hot cinnamon bun covered in syrup made from butter, sugar, maple and golden syrups, with a topping of chopped walnuts. As Nigella says, remove from tray and apply to face.  Admittedly, I had to have a little lie down before that part!

I wanted to write about this I think because I felt whole while baking and got a great sense of satisfaction by producing something. It takes me out of the merry-go-round of rehab for rehab’s sake and whilst something as complex as today’s baking challenge provides me with great rehab, it isn’t its purpose.
Maybe I should do a ‘Julie & Julia’ gig and commit to cooking every recipe in my beat up copy of ‘How to be a domestic goddess – Baking and the art of comfort cooking’.  I don’t think Nigella had recovery from brain surgery in her sights when she wrote it but by god, it is certainly providing me with great comfort and joy.

 

8 thoughts on “I Knead This

  1. I’m not quite managing a ‘Julie/Julia’ project – but I am finding cooking through Marcella Hazan’s ‘Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking’ is great therapy for an at-times-troubled heart and mind. I found the same with Nigella’s ‘Kitchen’. The trick is finding a cookbook with recipes that work – consistently – then I find it not so daunting to give new recipes a try 🙂 I love the look of these scrolls you’ve cooked.

  2. Ah ha! The Cooking Cure! I know it well. Always a cheer-up. It certainly sounds as though you rediscovered something. In my opinion, the best way to spend a horrible winter’s day is to spend it baking. Put on some favourite music (loudly) and then go at it. So much fun – and then you get to eat the result. I actually feel sorry for people who do not enjoy cooking. And Nigella L is deadly on anything chocolate isn’t she! I don’t have Basil Brush Cook Book. My oldest is a battered copy of Charmaine Solomon’s “Complete Asian Cookbook”.

    Claire x

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